• WEATHER ALERT Severe Thunderstorm Warning

Successful job hunting on the net

March 5, 2008 9:04:45 PM PST
Finding the right job always comes with challenges, especially with the economy so flat, but first it's important to find the right job website. We thought we'd help you out. Forget the newspaper classifieds, the Internet has changed the playing field in the game of job hunting. Patricia Rose, Director of Career Services at the University of Pennsylvania says job websites are "a great way to get information out there it's a great way to learn about opportunities."

But simply looking through laundry lists of available jobs is a daunting and often unproductive task. Experts suggest to use a job niche website that targets your career path.

EmploymentGuide.com specializes in hourly and skilled jobs, ranging from entry-level to mid-management positions.

If you're a high school student looking for a summer job groovejob.com is for you. Type in your city, zip and distance you're willing to travel and the site provides a list of opportunities in your area.

For senior-level professionals looking for the next step but can't find the time to job hunt, Risesmart.com offers experts prescreening of employment opportunities. The site matches the candidate with a position that matches his or her unique skills and experience.

Rose told Action News, "The more focused the site the better because it means a smaller number of people are logging in and the employers posting there are looking for people in that demographic."

If you want to get noticed, try logging on to VisualCV.com. This site brings your resume to life with pictures, video, and a digital portfolio of your best work samples. It's a great, interactive way of showcasing your skills and experience.

If you don't feel like waiting for a paycheck, NotchUp.com enables job seekers to get paid for interviewing. The idea is that prospective employees are going to cost a lot less for employers than paying a big headhunter.

But Rose said people should exercise caution with such websites.

"I would be a little wary. Most employers we work with don't have to pay employees to interview. They have people who are very anxious to interview, so I would do some do diligence before recommending that," he said.

Then there's myspace.com and facebook.com. Yes, even social networking sites are being utilized, specifically by employers.

A study by the networking firm Viadeo recently found that one in five employers now uses social networking Web sites, such as Facebook and MySpace, to research information on job candidates and to view how they project themselves. Almost two thirds said their recruitment decisions were influenced by the contents of an individual's profile, while a quarter said that they had changed their mind and decided not to hire someone because of what they found online.

So be careful what you put on your site.

Also beware of how much personal information you post on an online job site. Monster.com, the nation's largest online job site, has more than 50 million resumes in its database and gets 50,000 new ones every day. Privacy experts say that makes it a magnet for identity thieves and con artists.

Monster.com screens every job order that comes to its site. Any job requiring check cashing or bank payments is routinely deleted. Still, it's important to limit what you post about yourself. Just last year, hackers used an email scam to obtain information registered job seekers and used those details to ask for personal financial data, officials said. Monster.com provides more information on that scam. (Click here)

The company advises people that the following personal information should never be included:

* Social Security number
* Driver's license number
* Bank account information
* Credit card information
* Passwords
* Date of birth

Rose says keep these things in mind:

If you find a blind listing where you don't know a lot about the employers, it may just be someone trying to get your information. Verify an employer's legitimacy.

Never, never give your date of birth or social security number on your resume and be careful of where you post your resume.

Also, beware of employers who ask for background checks before offering you a job.

Below are some more job websites you might find useful:

JobCentral.com
Climber.com
Jobfox.com
JobCircle.com
Linkedin.com
Cheezhead.com
Hrseo.com


Load Comments