Brittle bones in men; food safety; teen blood donors

May 21, 2008 5:31:46 PM PDT
Trouble for teen blood donors, and trouble at the cookout.... First, a warning for men who think they are immune to brittle bones.

Brittle bone risk for men grows

Osteoporosis - brittle bone disease - shouldn't be considered a concern just for women.

The American College of Physicians now recommends screen for all older men too.

The medical group estimates that 1 in 16 older men has osteoporosis, and the number is growing.

Men who get very little exercise, lose a lot of weight, or use medications such as steroids or prostate cancer drugs face a higher risk.

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Spotlight on safe food handling

On this weekend for cookouts, the food industry has some words of warning on safety.

There's a big gap between what americans know they should be doing on food safety, and what actually happens in the kitchen.

For example, less than half of those surveyed actually use separate cutting boards for meats and product.

And barely a quarter use a meat thermometer.

But the good news is that most people say they DO wash their hands when preparing food.

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Teen blood donors have higher reaction rate

Just as teenagers are becoming an increasingly important source of donations comes a report that could make them less likely to give in the future.

A study for the latest Journal of the American Medical Association shows teens are more likely than adults to bruise, faint, or have other reaction from blood donation.

So far, there's no indication why the rate is higher.

Dr. Anne Eder, of the American Red Cross, says, "It is important to have well trained staff to recognize and treat reactions. We collect this data so that we can understand what's going on and so that we can evaluate the steps that we take hopefully to improve safety.

The Red Cross says there's a need for better awareness of potential reactions on high school blood drives.


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