Local shellfish ban

August 19, 2008 9:13:41 PM PDT
The Department of Environmental Protection has suspended shellfish harvested from a portion of the Delaware Bay.

Officials confirmed two cases of an illness called Vibrio parahaemolyticus. It's linked to oysters harvested from the bay.

It's a bacteria that naturally occurs in warm, coastal waters.

It can lead to abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, headache, fever and chills. People with compromised immune systems are most at risk.

West nile alert

There's another health alert from the DEP, especially for Southeastern Pennsylvania.

Officials say 70-percent of the state's mosquitoes infected with West Nile Virus are in this area.

So far, one woman in Montgomery county has been infected. She's now recovered, but the DEP is stepping up prevention efforts.

They'll be spraying and fogging more to get rid of mosquitoes.

They're also asking everyone to help get rid of standing water.

Most people bitten by an infected mosquito won't get sick.. but it's best to protect yourself with bug spray and long sleeves.

Applegate's tough decision

Christina Applegate says she's now cancer-free.

After being diagnosed with breast cancer, she decided to skip chemo and radiation. And although the cancer was only in one breast, she had a double mastectomy.

She spoke exclusively to Good Morning America's Robin Roberts about her decision.

"I didn't want to go back to the doctors every four months for testing and squishing and everything," Applegate said. "I just wanted to be rid of this whole thing at least for me so this was the choice that I made and it was a tough one."

Now the 36-year-old actress wants to help other women with high-risk pay for MRI's. That's what detected her tumor early.

Applegate is considered high-risk because her mother also battled breast cancer. They have the BRACA1 breast cancer gene.

The standard screening tool for low-risk women is still a mammogram starting at age 40.


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