Exclusive access to FBI's anti-terror training

November 5, 2010 9:14:39 PM PDT
The FBI and other law enforcement agencies gave Action News cameras unprecedented access so that we could see for ourselves how their tactical teams stay on top of the latest terror threats.

With bombs hidden in suitcases and corners at the Philadelphia International Airport, we saw the latest training involving canines from several different law enforcement agencies.

"There are all different explosives, the primary ones we want to imprint the dogs on are the peroxide based explosives, which are TATP and HMTD," FBI Special Agent Mike Baker said.

These explosives are also known as kitchen sink bombs, incredibly simple to make, but can cause maximum damage if put in the right place.

"In the last 10 years, we've been seeing more and more instances of peroxide based explosives being used in criminal activity," Baker said.

From the shoe bomber in 2001 to the Christmas Day bomber last year, each one involved an explosive that contained TATP.

The FBI allowed us to film training on Fort Dix as they created a potential hostage scenario.

"Our main function is to conduct high risk arrests of dangerous individuals that are subjects of our investigation," Supervisor for FBI SWAT Team Jeff Grizzle said.

Even the local FBI SWAT team has to prepare for situations involving terrorism.

In 2007, they played an integral role in the take down of 6 men trying to stage an attack on Fort Dix.

"Our FBI team from Philadelphia arrested several of the main subjects in an apartment complex in Cherry Hill , in conjunction with the Cherry Hill Police Department SWAT team ," Grizzle said.

The Fort Dix 6 event and others serves as evidence that al-Qaida will continue to recruit U.S. citizens.

Assistant Special Agent in Charge of Counterterrorism Doug Lindquist says the fight against terror is becoming increasingly difficult and they can't do it alone.

"Counterterrorism is like being a goalie, and you're going to get a lot of shots on goal, and we've gotten a lot more in the last year, and it's a difficult job, but we certainly need all the help we can get," Lindquist said.

As it pertains to the peroxide based explosives, it's not just terrorism the FBI is concerned about.

The FBI says a majority of incidents in the United States come from children and adults experimenting with these dangerous ingredients.


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