Jerry Sandusky trial: Accuser says he screamed for help

June 14, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
The prosecution in the Jerry Sandusky trial ended its presentation on Thursday with the testimony of an alleged victim who said he screamed for help in Sandusky's basement.

The heart-rending tale from the eighth accuser to testify brought the courtroom to tears once again.

The 18-year-old man, identified as Victim 9, said that his mother encouraged him to spend time with Sandusky, so he spent more than 100 nights at the coach's house from July 2005 to December 2008. During that time, Sandusky would come downstairs to the basement, drop his pants and rape him, the accuser said.

"He started getting physical, like having me touch his penis and stuff," he said. "He made me give him a, suck his penis is how you'd put it. He came in my room, pulled his pants down, laid on top of me, and kind of forced it in. What was I going to do? I mean look at him, he's a big guy. He was bigger than me, at the time way bigger than me."

He said his muffled screams went unanswered by Sandusky's wife, Dottie, who was upstairs, so he figured the basement must be soundproof. Under cross-examination by defense lawyer Joe Amendola, the accuser said the attacks sometimes left him bleeding but that he never sought medical attention.

"I just dealt with it. I never told anybody, I didn't even tell my own mom. I just deal with things in my own way," he said.

After Victim 9's testimony, Judge John Cleland told jurors there would be no court Friday. The defense is expected to begin its case Monday. Sandusky, 68, is charged with 52 counts of sex abuse involving 10 boys over a 15-year span. He has denied the charges.

Earlier Thursday, two more accusers took the stand at the sex-abuse trial. A 25-year-old man, identified as Victim 6, testified that as a young boy, he idolized the Penn State football team, and the day he got to try on football helmets and shoulder pads from the star players was a thrilling day.

But then Sandusky asked the then-11-year-old to take a shower, the man testified. The coach bear-hugged him, tickled him and called himself the "tickle monster" and lifted him up in the shower, saying he was going to "squeeze (the boy's) guts out."

The man said he "blacked out" when Sandusky lifted him up in the shower, and he could not remember exactly what happened next.

"I remember going into the shower head and having to close my eyes so soap wouldn't go in, and that's the last thing I remember about being in the shower. That's the best recollection I've got," he told jurors.

The boy's mother went to authorities when she saw her son come home with wet hair, but the 1998 investigation ultimately ended without any charges being filed.

One of the investigators who interviewed the boy and Sandusky at the time, Ronald Schreffler, told the court he thought charges were warranted but that the district attorney, Ray Gricar, disagreed. Gricar cannot explain his decision - he disappeared in 2005 and was later declared legally dead.

Amendola, quickly pulled apart the 1998 incident during cross-examination. He noted that though the alleged victim said he did not remember what happened in the shower, he told Schreffler in the days following the incident that he was sure there was no sexual contact. Amendola stressed the Gricar decided not to press charges because there was no evidence of sexual abuse.

Amendola had Victim 6 read text messages to jurors that he sent to Sandusky as recently as 2009, wishing him a happy Father's Day and telling him on Thanksgiving that he was grateful God placed Sandusky in his life. The man also had lunch with Sandusky as recently as summer 2011.

Another man, identified as Victim 3, testified that when he was wrestling and tickling with Sandusky when he was 12, he would have an erection, and the coach would sometimes touch his penis. The alleged victim, now 25 and a member of the Army National Guard, said he loved Sandusky and was disappointed when he was sent to a group home and had to break off contact.

"He made me feel like I was a part of something, like a family," the man said. "He gave me things that I hadn't had before."

ABC News and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Load Comments