2nd suspect in custody, hundreds attend officer's funeral

19-year-old Chancier McFarland, the second suspect arrested in connection with the murder of Officer Moses Walker, Jr. flew into town from Atlanta escorted by police.
August 28, 2012 3:01:26 AM PDT
The second suspect in the murder of a police officer was brought back to Philadelphia Monday night after surrendering to the FBI in Alabama.

PHOTOS: Website and iPad visitors | Wireless visitors

19-year-old Chancier McFarland, the second suspect arrested in connection with the murder of Officer Moses Walker, Jr. flew into town from Atlanta escorted by police.

McFarland turned himself into the FBI Sunday in Alabama where he was staying with family.

Police said late Monday night they were processing McFarland on two previous robbery charges and will then begin questioning him about Officer Walker's murder.

Hearing the news that McFarland was back in Philadelphia to face charges was comforting to Officer Walker's friends and colleagues.

The group gathered at FOP headquarters Monday night to raise money for the slain officer's family.

"His soul is gone, but at least he's at peace now knowing that they both were caught before he was laid to rest," Sgt. Sylvia Young of the 22nd District said.

"To Officer Walker's family, to his mother, it's a great relief," FOP President John McNesby said.

On Friday, murder charges were filed against 23-year-old Rafael Jones. Police say he's the man who pulled the trigger and ended Walker's life on Saturday August 18th.

It's believed McFarland is the accomplice.

The duo was captured on surveillance video following Officer Walker on Cecil B. Moore Avenue.

Detectives say Walker was in plain clothes and had just finished his shift at the 22nd police district when he was gunned down in an apparent robbery.

Earlier Monday, a funeral service was held at the Deliverance Evangelistic Church in North Philadelphia for Officer Walker as he was laid to rest and his life was celebrated.

"I'm very angry that someone would kill Moses Walker," Mayor Michael Nutter during funeral service. "Very angry."

"I am sick of the ignorance, sick of the violence, sick of the death," Nutter said. "Let us all rededicate our lives to peace and let Moses Walker - as Moses would lead the way - show us how to live our lives in peace, in truth, in love."

"I hope and pray that Moses realizes the impact that he had on others, because he truly did have an impact not just on me but on the hundreds of other people you see gathered here today," said Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey.

Gathered for Monday's service were family members, friends and his Philadelphia Police family, but also hundreds of officers representing cities and towns from New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware.

Close-in communities sent motorcycle units to join the massive funeral processions that wound through the city: all the way from the church in North Philadelphia to Walker's final resting place in Delaware County.

"When will it stop? It just seems like it's that church bell that tolls at every funeral. It just slowly tolls, and each time it tolls it's another cop," said Upper Darby Police Sergeant Harold Parson. The viewing for Officer Walker began on Sunday night. The bagpipes played as Officer Walker's casket was carried in. The salute concluded a procession down Lehigh Avenue led by Mayor Michael Nutter and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey.

"I think it's pretty apparent the number of men and women from the 22nd District, entire command staff, paying tribute to Moses Walker. Not for how he died, but for how he lived and served the citizens of the city," said Commissioner Ramsey.

The lines formed around the corner as Family, friends, colleagues and even strangers came to pay their respects.

"He was just a loving guy. He loved the Lord, and he loved people," said Viola Mills, friend.

Walker's brothers and sisters in blue walked somberly behind the hearse as his family held each other in support.

Those who knew him say Officer Walker was a dedicated member of his church and family.

"Basically he was the backbone of his immediate family. He spoke well of everyone, he was the nicest person you would ever want to meet," said Preston Scott, cousin.

Others remember Officer Walker for his faith and his kindness.

"He would get off of work, open the church, warm up the church, get the church ready for service, stay for service and then go home. How many people would you find like that," said Tamika Andrew.

It was a tough day for Officer Walker's family, friends and police colleagues, but they say they now have a sense of comfort knowing that both suspects are in custody. .


Load Comments