Dealing with tough questions after Conn. tragedy

December 16, 2012 11:03:24 AM PST
Parents and children alike face many questions in the wake of the tragedy in Connecticut.

"I think everyone's hearts are broken," said Joanne Rosen.

"I pity the scars that were left on the children that were there," said Bernard Lazarus.

There is immense grief and questions of how to repair the broken, confused and angered hearts of those families affected by the mass shooting in Newtown.

Local child psychiatrist Dr. Steven Berkowitz says with an abundance of love and support the victims can heal.

"For a 4, 5, 6, 7-year old, they're going to be very reliant on the cues from their adult caregivers," said Dr. Berkowitz.

Younger children are more in tune with nonverbal cues. Berkowitz advises parents to shield these innocent eyes from repeated news coverage and talk with their older children about the evil tragedy to help ease their fears.

Dana and Adam Procopio of Moorestown, New Jersey have three kids ages 3 through 7.

"I told them that they were safe, their school was safe," said Dana Procopio.

"I was out to lunch with friends and it overwhelmed me. I put myself in the shoes of the parents who lost children," said Adam.

The grief associated with the loss of a child is incomprehensible. Dr. Berkowitz says those parents will need professional support

"You feel isolated. You have the sense that even the person had the same experience as you, they can't possibly understand what you're going through," he said.

In the end, time will help heal their wounds.


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