Cozy way to get through chemo treatments

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November 8, 2013 3:26:08 PM PST
Typically when someone goes in for chemotherapy treatments, the room can be cold and so can the medicine, making things very uncomfortable.

Unfortunately, a local man knows this experience firsthand. But it gave him a great idea.

Three years ago Greg Hamilton had just started a new job, was a new father, and was diagnosed with osteosarcoma - a bone cancer in his chest.

"It was absolutely brutal, he was really, really sick," recalls Greg's wife, Ellen.

He had surgery and then 10 months of chemotherapy.

"I would spend hours there a day and it was always cold and we were connected to tubes and leads and it was just uncomfortable," Greg said.

So, looking to add a bit of comfort, he and Ellen searched for something he could wear that would keep him warm, but also keep the nurses from asking him to undress.

Ellen tells us, "I was really surprised at the lack of things that are out there."

That's what lead to the Chemo Cozy fleece. It's super soft and has strategically placed zippers.

A nurse can sterilize the area, access either a port in the chest or PICC line in the arm, then pull the tubes through. There's also a pocket for a smartphone or heart monitor.

And the finishing touch... a message: Think Happy.

"Being positive and always thinking about the good things are really kind of what gets you through the really difficult times," said Greg.

Greg and Ellen didn't just stop at one fleece, they took their idea to Kickstarter and quickly raised enough money to start producing more fleeces to help more people battling cancer.

As for Greg, he is still fighting. Their son Jack is now 4-years-old.

Greg says, "But I feel a lot better than I have in a few years so that's good. You just keep moving forward."

And so far, they've donated some of the fleeces to local hospitals. And people can also now purchase them online if you know someone undergoing cancer treatment. Some of the proceeds will go to cancer research.


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