Philadelphia University exhibit examines Kennedy assassination

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November 22, 2013 2:38:07 PM PST
Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, young staffers from the Warren Commission were tasked to find the answers.

Among the group that was future senator Arlen Specter.

It's the work of his group that is the focus of an exhibit at Philadelphia University called "Single Bullet."

It's named for Specter's "Single Bullet Theory." As the theory went, the bullet was fired from the book depository, struck President Kennedy, exited his neck and then cut through Texas Governor John Connelly's chest, wrist and into his thigh.

"The young lawyers who came to investigate this actually wanted to find a conspiracy. They thought it would be more interesting," said Evan Laine of Philadelphia University.

This exhibit at Philadelphia University examines key evidence that was evaluated 50 years ago. There is a loop of the Zapruder film and, nearby, students and staff created a full scale mockup of Kennedy's limo as it passed through Dealey Plaza.

"The students decided it was really important to create that experience of putting yourself in the car and trying to understand the shots," said Dave Kratzer of Philadelphia University.

There is a 'you are there' quality as you are invited to sit behind a mannequin representing Connelly.

TV monitors show cross hairs and a red dot, focused just above that seat back from the vantage of the book depository - as well as the grassy knoll where, some conspiracy theorists maintain, there was another gunman.

The Commission, of course, found Oswald acted alone. Attorney Shanin Specter was a little boy when his dad investigated JFK's death.

"Anyone can go to the exhibition and judge for themselves whether the single bullet theory accurate or inaccurate and it provides all viewpoints on the subject," he said.

The exhibit is located at the university's library on Henry Avenue and is open to the public 9 to 5 weekdays until April.

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