Suit: Fire risk known before Carnival ship sailed

In this image released by the U.S. Coast Guard on Feb. 11, 2013, a small boat belonging to the Coast Guard Cutter Vigorous patrols near the cruiseship Carnival Triumph in the Gulf of Mexico, Feb. 11, 2013. The Carnival Triumph has been floating aimlessly about 150 miles off the Yucatan Peninsula since a fire erupted in the aft engine room early Sunday, knocking out the ship's propulsion system. No one was injured and the fire was extinguished. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard- Lt. Cmdr. Paul McConnell)
December 17, 2013 7:10:48 PM PST
Documents filed in the past few days in federal court in Miami indicate Carnival Cruise Lines knew about a risk of leaks from engine fuel hoses and recommended precautions before the ill-fated voyage of the Carnival Triumph.

A lawsuit filed in February on behalf of dozens of passengers argues the cruise line and its parent Carnival Corporation were negligent in maintenance, allowing Triumph to sail from Galveston on Feb. 7.

A February 10 fire disabled the ship. Passengers endured a nightmarish tow to Mobile, Alabama.

CNN first reported on the newly filed documents.

Carnival said in a response filed Tuesday that the ship's engines passed inspection before departing for the four-day cruise and its own recommendation to install spray shields on flexible fuel lines was beyond any required safety measures.


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