Philadelphia speakers added to DNC list

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Along with the star-studded list of politicians expected to speak at the convention, the Clinton campaign asked real Americans to share their stories. (WPVI)

In less than six days, Democrats from around the country will descend on Philadelphia to officially designate Hillary Clinton as their nominee for president.

Along with the star-studded list of politicians expected to speak at the convention, the Clinton campaign asked real Americans to share their stories.

Four of the speakers are from Philadelphia. Child advocate lawyer Kate Burdick is one of those chosen.

"It's overwhelming, but of course exciting. I'm just so honored to have been chosen," Burdick said.

Burdick got the call last week that the Clinton campaign had tapped her to speak next Tuesday at the DNC to help emphasize the Secretary's early public service career.

"It will be highlighting Hillary's work in the child welfare and juvenile justice system and my own small role in continuing that fight in Philadelphia and throughout the country," Burdick said.

Anton Moore of South Philadelphia told us how he felt when he got the call.

"Aw man, excited, I was just speechless," Moore said.

Moore was picked by the Clinton campaign to take to the podium to highlight another of the Democratic Party nominee's top issues - gun violence.

"You have police violence and inner-city violence going on right now. It's plaguing our community. So trying to bring everything together and get an understanding of what's going on is what we're going to try to do," Moore said.

As Moore and Burdick work on their convention remarks, some 500 union workers, most from Philadelphia, are feverishly working on the massive infrastructure needed for the convention which kicks off Monday.

A key supervisor says they will complete their tasks by Saturday; they were not giving any peeks yet at the hi-tech stage and speaker's podium.

"Because of their experience in 2000 with the Republican National Convention, we were able to get a head start. Their heads were in the right place; instead of having to come in and spend a month or so educating them on what this is, they were able come with some plans and say 'we should think about doing this,'" Travis Dredd, Deputy CEO of the Convention Complex, said.
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politics2016 democratic national convention - dncphilly newspolitics
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