Could Harriet Tubman one day replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill?

A campaign hopes to replace former president Andrew Jackson with abolitionist Harriet Tubman by 2020, the centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment. (AP)

The grassroots campaign to put a woman on U.S. currency has finished its voting poll and revealed they hope will one day replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill: abolitionist Harriet Tubman.

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"Women On 20s" began calling for votes earlier in the year, gaining much momentum through social media through the hashtag #WomenOn20s. Eventually, the non-profit organization finalized its candidates to just four significant women in American history: Eleanor Roosevelt, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks and Wilma Mankiller. After 10 weeks, the former slave and Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman was chosen as the winner and will be included on the bill they will deliver before Congress.

PHOTOS: The Final Four Candidates


Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., praised the campaign for its efforts all during the voting process, and introduced a bill in April that would ask the Treasury Department to convene a panel to discuss the issue of placing a woman on U.S. currency.


"Women on 20s" hopes to have the bill approved by 2020, the centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right to vote. According to their website, the process does not need to go through Congress for approval, but straight to President Barack Obama.

According to "Women on 20s," all it takes to change the face of the $20 bill is an an order from the Secretary of the Treasury, which can be directed by the incumbent president. Obama has repeatedly mentioned in the past that he would like to see a woman on U.S. currency, and has voiced his support to ask the Treasury to make this change.

Democratic presidential candidate Hilary Clinton also voiced her support for to replace Jackson with Tubman.

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