Many say they are not concerned with COVID-19 as summer kicks off

Since the beginning of 2022, nearly 190,000 Americans have died due to COVID-19, with 300 Americans dying each day.

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ByJaclyn Lee via WPVI logo
Thursday, July 7, 2022
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Since the beginning of 2022, nearly 190,000 Americans have died due to COVID-19, with 300 Americans dying each day.

KING OF PRUSSIA, Pennsylvania (WPVI) -- With summer officially underway, many Delaware Valley residents tell Action News that COVID-19 is the last thing they're thinking about.

"I actually just got back from Florida and I was at the shore and I'm going to Punta Cana next week, so it's not impacting my travel," said Abbey Zollers of Collegeville, Pa.

"It's just gone on the back burner," said Inosico Lavanua of King of Prussia, Pa. "We don't talk about it much anymore so we just hang out and do whatever we need to do."

However, since the beginning of 2022, nearly 190,000 Americans have died due to COVID-19, with 300 Americans dying each day. Experts say the situation has improved since the beginning of the pandemic, but we aren't out of the woods just yet.

"Viruses can mutate so we can potentially see more variants down the road, but we are more prepared," said Dr. Delana Wardlaw of Temple Health. "We can readily test, readily vaccinate and readily give medication."

According to the Action News Data Journalism Team, Philadelphia's COVID-19 positivity rate dropped significantly earlier this year, but has remained at more than 10% since May.

Now, the FDA is allowing pharmacists, not just doctors, to prescribe Paxlovid, the antiviral medication that is supposed to reduce the risk of severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19.

"It allows increased accessibility," said Dr. Wardlaw. "Any time you have increased access and decrease in any barriers that people have for receiving treatment, that allows us to increase the amount of people that we can provide the medication for."

Last month, the FDA and CDC approved kids between 6 months and four years old to get the COVID vaccine, but not all parents are jumping at that chance.

"For me, I'm just not ready for them to get vaccinated," said Amber Oliver of Collingdale, Pa.

And others say most of their inner circle has experienced COVID-19.

"It's almost shocking if you haven't had COVID, it's like 'wow, you made it this far, good job,'" said Jenna Linstra of King of Prussia, Pa.