How does overturning Roe v. Wade impact women in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware?

In Pennsylvania, abortion is legal up to 24 weeks in a pregnancy, but Republicans are aiming to restrict access.

Saturday, June 25, 2022
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After the Supreme Court's highly anticipated ruling striking down Roe v. Wade, many Pennsylvanians will look to the candidates up for election in November.

CAMDEN, New Jersey (WPVI) -- After the Supreme Court's highly anticipated ruling striking down Roe v. Wade, many Pennsylvanians will look to the candidates up for election in November.

Right now, in Pennsylvania, abortion is legal up to 24 weeks in a pregnancy. Abortions may be performed after 24 weeks only if the mother's health is at risk.

The Republican-controlled state legislature is moving several bills through the House that would restrict abortion access.

RELATED: Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, transforming abortion rights in US

Governor Tom Wolf, a Democrat, has said he will veto them. But in November, voters across the Commonwealth will choose a new governor.

Republican candidate Sen. Doug Mastriano said during a primary debate this spring that he is firmly against abortion at all stages of pregnancy - with no exceptions for rape or incest.

"I am pro-life. It's the number one issue," said Mastriano. "I'm at conception. We're going to have to work our way towards that."

Democratic candidate Josh Shapiro said he will keep Pennsylvania's abortion laws as they are.

"Look, it's not freedom to tell a woman what she can do with her own body and tell them that the politicians in Harrisburg know better. That's not freedom," said Shapiro.

The GOP-controlled legislature currently has several bills pending including Mastriano's "heart beat bill" banning an abortion after six weeks.

There is also a bill for a constitutional amendment to put a decision on the ballot for voters to decide. That could go either way - the restrictions that could come out of that would eliminate taxpayer dollars to pay for abortions.

RELATED: Which states are banning abortion immediately? State-by-state breakdown of abortion laws, bans

Stacy Hawkins, vice dean of Rutgers Law School in Camden, said this ruling was not a surprise, and while it will have widespread effects on abortion laws, she believes it will have an impact on voter turnout.

"But perhaps one of the positive consequences is that it really is going to ignite significant voter engagement," said Hawkins.

In New Jersey, abortion rights are protected by state law.

In May, Gov. Phil Murphy proposed legislation protecting patients and providers from legal retaliation from other states.

"Let there be no doubt we will ensure that every woman in New Jersey has access to an abortion into the full range of reproductive services they deserve as a matter of right," said Murphy during a press conference Friday morning.

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Delaware also has abortion rights protected in state law.

Similar to New Jersey, legislation was recently introduced to expand access to abortion in Delaware, and protect providers and patients from legal action from other states in anticipation of Roe being overturned.

RELATED: Protesters gather in Philadelphia after Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade