Minute Suites offers airport refuge

Minute Suites says after a successful first attempt at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, it brought a bigger sequel to Philadelphia International Airport.

April 6, 2011 3:58:00 PM PDT
If you're one of the many unfortunate fliers who've been stranded at the airport because of weather cancellations, engine problems or other flight delays, you've likely wished for a quiet place to escape. Well, now you can catch a snooze before you catch your flight.

It might be small, but Minute Suites says their little 7' by 8' traveler's retreat is a big upgrade from waiting out a layover or delay at the gate.

"It is meant to be a small place where people can have privacy," Daniel Solomon, the CEO of Minute Suites told Action News.

It has a bed, blankets, internet, TV and movies. It's cool and it's quiet.

"In a very noisy airport - you want to get rid of the sound and the stress shuts door," Solomon said. "It's like a little soundproof booth. "

Plus it's secure. There's a 500 pound door with Australian deadbolt locks.

And of course there is an alarm clock so you don't miss your flight

Minute Suites says after a successful first attempt at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, it brought a bigger sequel to Philadelphia International Airport. There are more rooms which are named for local landmarks.

Frequent flier Kathryn McKinley has lived through her fair traveler's share of delays. The Philadelphia resident says she suffered through "8 hours when we had snow and we were delayed, so something like this would have been wonderful."

At the front desk you'll find a staff of students like Sanja Panic from Temple University's School of Tourism and Hospitality Management. "It's a big opportunity because it is a company is starting off big and there are going to be so many opportunities."

It will cost you $30 an hour -- $120 for an overnight stay -- to get some shuteye and take care of business. Just don't try any funny business.

If Minute Suite workers think a guest has been up to no good in any of the rooms, "there's ways in our system so they will never be a guest again," says Solomon.


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