U.S. Open tickets now selling for up to $1250 apiece

June 4, 2013 3:40:22 PM PDT
We are just over a week away from the start of the U.S. Open at Merion, and tickets are a valuable commodity around these parts.

Action News was out on the famed course Tuesday night, near the 15th fairway, one of the holes that borders Club House Rd.

During the tournament, this road will be packed with golf fans. But some will have paid much more than others for the privilege.

As how much he would pay for a ticket, Paul Tomlinson of Broomall, Pa. told me $3,000.

He was joking, of course. But others will be paying big bucks to see the best players in the world out here next week - players like Rory McElroy, out for a practice round Tuesday.

Because the course is on a tight piece of real estate, only 25,000 people will be allowed in each day. That's about a third of the attendance at other recent U.S. Opens.

The tournament is sold out, but some ticket holders are on eBay and StubHub, trying to sell their $100 dollar tickets for upwards of $1200.

"They can keep 'em. I'll watch on TV. It'll be a fun time to watch, right in the neighborhood. $100 is my top," said John Hirt of Marple Township.

Golfers at nearby Paxon Hollow Country Club were appalled by the asking prices for U.S. Open tickets.

According to StubHub, prices for general admission tickets are ranging from a low of $210 to $1250.

At this point, they're merely asking prices, and they will likely fluctuate wildly as time runs out.

"I'd rather watch on TV. A couple hundred bucks, it's a little too expensive," said Bob Vent of Springfield.

Padraig Flattery is from Galway, Ireland. He says his friends back home would hang him if he didn't attend the Open while visiting his wife's family in Havertown.

And he was smart. He bought the tickets 6 months ago on line for $110 each.

"I just picked them up yesterday. There was some confusion with delivery between Ireland and here, but I eventually got the tickets yesterday. They're locked away at home," he told Action News.

The tickets are indeed precious given the limited number issued. In the days ahead we'll see just how much people will be willing to pay to say they were here when history was made once again at Merion.


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