Firefighter's "Thank You" signs spark cycle of giving in Bucks County

LEVITTOWN, Pa. -- Some say actions speak louder than words. In this case, words are putting the community in action.

It doesn't take much more than a big, bold "Thank you," a phrase that has taken on a new meaning during the COVID-19 crisis. Essential workers from first responders to janitorial staff are being thanked for their life-risking efforts to keep the world turning.

Chuck Klein, creator of Green Turtle Designs in Bucks County, is using those two words to make a real difference. At the start of the pandemic, he sold and delivered nearly 100 lawn-signs bearing the phrase, "Thank You," to members of the community. Then, he took it a step further.

Partnering with small businesses, Klein made his signs available for purchase at small shops such as Johnny Longhots in Fairless Hills. Co-owner Joseph LoDuca tells us he's seen an uptick in customers who come for a sign and leave with a sandwich.

The chain reaction continues a step further when Klein uses the profit to fund meal donations to essential workers. After he and his son delivered food to the mask-clad staff at Jefferson Bucks Hospital, Klein said, "You can see it in their eyes and you can hear it in their voice, how appreciative they are."

Klein empathizes with the daunting tasks faced by first responders, being a firefighter himself. He works 24-hour shifts with the Department of Defense in Colts Neck, New Jersey. His successful career fighting fires allows him to continue this cycle of gratitude with little to no profit.

He hopes to set an example of morality for his son, Bobby. As a newborn, Bobby spent his days going in and out of the hospital. Klein admired the way he slept on his stomach with his arms tucked in like a turtle, which became the inspiration for Green Turtle Designs. The company began in 2013 as a way to fund then-4-year-old Bobby's passion to become a racecar driver.

For more information about the company or to learn how to purchase a sign, visit their Facebook page.

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