Fighting gout with the Sixers; skin pain from migraine

June 13, 2008 3:43:29 PM PDT
Migraine pain; making healthcare fair; Mo Cheeks battles gout

Skin Migraine Pain

For some people,,, migraines are more than just a severe headache.

In a new study, nearly two-thirds of migraine sufferers also reported having a painful skin sensitivity called allodynia.

That means that everyday actions such as rubbing your head, combing your hair, or wearing a necklace or earrings, can cause pain.

The study was published in the journal Neurology. Researchers also say the condition may signal an increase in the frequency of migraines.

Allodynia is more common in women, and migraine sufferers who are obese, or who also suffered depression.

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Closing the Racial Gap

Pennsylvania will benefit from a $300 million dollar effort to close the racial gap in health care.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is putting up the money after a recent study shows big differences... in depending on a person's race, and where he or she lives.

14 areas, including Pennsylvania, will receive money to bring communities up to national standards.

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Coach's Campaign

Sixers coach Maurice Cheeks is trying to slam dunk a misunderstood medical condition called gout.

Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson are among the famous sufferers of this painful form of arthritis.

Cheeks has had it too, since 2001.

Cheeks described the first episode to Action News, "My foot was swelling up, and I thought it was the shoe, and I came to find out it was the gout that really did it."

The episodes came and went, till this past season, when the swelling & pain was so bad, Cheeks coached some games wearing only one shoe.

He says, "Serious pain - I can't even describe the pain that it was."

Cheeks is now working with the Gout and Uric Acid Education Association to help others understand that the disease is a serious one that affects 5 million Americans.

Dr. N. Lawrence Edwards, the head of the association, says, "This disease itself can lead from the intermittent episodes to evolve into a crippling form of arthritis."

Cheeks is now taking control of his gout, and hopes other sufferers will do the same.


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