Calendar says spring, not so much for local landscapers

Watch report from Action News
March 27, 2014 3:55:21 PM PDT
Area landscapers are way behind on their spring planting season thanks to Mother Nature's wrath this winter, and some local homeowners are dealing with lots of damaged plants and shrubs.

Perrenials, like daffodils are beginning to emerge from flower beds in area neighborhoods, but almost every yard is absent of the colorful annuals you usually see this time of year.

Even outside local nurseries struggled with the tumbling temps.

"With the night time temperatures going down into freezing, we couldn't chance leaving them out," said Michael Gardener.

Owner, Michael Gardener, and his manager have had to put their pansies in a poly house or overwintering tent.

Gardner says they would get shipments anticipating the regular spring season, but it just hasn't happened yet.

He says they even had to bring the lily turf and acouba inside.

"Broad leaf evergreens like this can get winter burn, which they generally recover by May," said Trish Maryott.

The same is true of the pyaris Andromeda and the photenia.

"They are beautiful dense plants; they are very susceptible to winter, very susceptible to winter burn," said Maryott. "These are Japanese Holly, and we have rhododendron which is a wonderful spring plant, but this winter they took a hit."

Landscapers say to protect your plants next winter, put your mulch down in the fall to hold the moisture in.

"You need to remove the old mulch, not just put more on top. You actually start to strangle the plants," said Gardener.

Unable to begin their planting, landscapers have been busy hauling gravel and supplying nurseries with river rock for hardscaping properties.

And the clean-up continues everywhere; crews clearing downed trees and branches from the winter storms.

Despite the fact that they are nearly a month behind schedule, Michael says spring planting will begin just as soon as we see more consistent warm weather.

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