John Rawlins
JOHN RAWLINS, an Action News general assignment reporter, joined 6abc in April 1981. John came to Channel 6 from WAVE-TV in Louisville, Kentucky, where he was their "Probe Reporter."

John Rawlins' reporting has had a measurable impact on the community. Mr. Rawlins played an instrumental role in exposing an employment service scam, which promised jobs that never materialized. His series of reports on the design deficiencies of bullet-proof vests resulted in the Philadelphia Police Department upgrading its vests. He also investigated prescription trends for the addictive drugs "Quaaludes"; and those reports prompted a federal probe leading to the introduction of legislation making the manufacture, sale and use of Quaaludes illegal in Pennsylvania.

Before beginning his investigative reporting for WAVE-TV, Rawlins was the station's educational/general assignment reporter. While at WAVE-TV in Louisville, Rawlins received a number of awards, including a first place in investigative journalism for the Louisville Press Association for his series "Kentucky Coal: A Matter of Crime," in which he exposed a multimillion dollar coal fraud scheme.

He served as a weekend anchor/reporter for WKYT-TV in Lexington, Kentucky prior to joining WAVE-TV. John received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science from the University of Kentucky. John was born in Washington D.C. He is married and lives in the Philadelphia suburbs.


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