Dashcam video shows New Jersey officer being struck, injured while on duty

Police say the driver, 52-year-old Rachel Glatt, left the scene and was later arrested.

Trish Hartman Image
Wednesday, April 26, 2023
Dashcam video shows officer being struck, injured while on duty
As the officer recovers from his injuries at home, authorities are now warning people to give police and other responders plenty of room on the side of the road.

ROBBINSVILLE, New Jersey (WPVI) -- Shocking dashcam video released Tuesday shows the moment a Robbinsville police officer was run down by a car while helping another driver over the weekend.

As the officer recovers from his injuries at home, authorities are now warning people to give police and other responders plenty of room on the side of the road.

The dashcam video shows the officer, 25-year-old Patrolman Connor Boyle, helping a stranded driver in Saturday night's wet weather, around 11:30 p.m. on Route 130 southbound.

"There's a parking lot right there, we're going to push you into there okay?" Boyle is heard saying to the driver.

Then another car comes from behind, hits his patrol car, strikes Boyle and does not appear to stop.

Boyle is pushed up onto the hood of the striking car before landing on the ground.

Folks at a local business nearby say it's usually pretty quiet at that time of night.

"I wouldn't think it would be that hard to move over a lane, especially if they're on 130 that late," said Nour Abdellateif, who works at Lotus Grill on Route 130.

Police say the driver, 52-year-old Rachel Glatt, left the scene and was later arrested.

She faces multiple charges, including leaving the scene of an accident, careless driving and failure to change lanes for an emergency vehicle.

Police say she was transported to the Mercer County Correctional Facility.

Action News reached out to Glatt's attorney, who had no comment on Tuesday.

By Monday, Boyle had been released from the hospital.

On Tuesday afternoon, Robbinsville Township posted a photo showing Boyle on crutches, smiling.

But authorities say this was too close of a call.

"Slow down when you see emergency lights, even tow trucks, and move over," said Lt. Carlos Docarmo, station commander for New Jersey State Police's Hamilton Substation.

Local and state police are reminding the public of New Jersey's Move Over Law, which requires drivers passing an emergency vehicle to move over one lane if possible, and to slow down to below the speed limit.

State police spoke with us in Hamilton Township near a memorial for Trooper Marc Castellano, who was struck and killed along the side of the highway in 2010.

"Part of our duties is to help out the public. And every time I hear another police officer or trooper getting struck, it's always the same thing -- someone didn't move over or slow down to give that person the opportunity for us to help them out," said Docarmo.

According to the New Jersey Division of a Highway Traffic Safety, in 2022 there were 1,153 summonses issued for violation of the Move Over Law.

Police say Boyle was in a marked car with flashing lights on.

Police say once Boyle recovers, he'll be starting a new position as a school resource officer at Pond Road Middle School.