MOVE members, community protest outside Penn Museum after disturbing revelations

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Old wounds and pain were reignited with the revelation that the remains of children killed in the 1985 MOVE bombing in Philadelphia were being used for research and housed at the Penn Museum.

Hundreds of outraged people gathered outside the museum on Wednesday to demand answers.

"They're grave robbers, they're interlopers, they're marauders," said an activist speaking at the rally.

"Oh, it hurts. Every time I think about it, it takes me back to 1985," said Mike Africa Jr.

Almost 36 years after the city's bombing of the MOVE headquarters on Osage Avenue, in which 11 people were killed, old wounds and pain were reignited when it was revealed that the remains of two children, 14-year-old Tree Africa and her 12-year-old sister Delisha, were being used for research and teaching at the University of Pennsylvania's Penn Museum.

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Family members are demanding answers after the remains of children killed in the 1985 MOVE bombing in Philadelphia reportedly can't be located.



"It is impossible to call these monsters people or women or men because they are monsters," said Mike Africa, Jr.

Pamela Africa says everyone involved should be prosecuted if not fired.

"This was intentional, it was deliberate and we are not accepting it," she said.

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber says he's "concerned" over reports that the remains were used for instruction on campus.

"I have accordingly authorized a fact-finding effort, to be conducted by outside counsel, to help us gain a complete understanding of the scope and nature of Princeton's role in the handling of the remains and related issues. The University will share its findings and use them to help shape the steps we can take moving forward for our community," said Eisgruber.



The University of Pennsylvania, who also hired outside counsel, issued a statement apologizing to the Africa family and community members for "allowing human remains recovered from the MOVE house to be used for research and teaching."

But Pamela Africa says no one from the universities have talked to them.

"What kind of apology is that? Talk to us, we're here," she said.

The Africas want those responsible to be held accountable.

"To be held accountable for what they did to our family, and we ain't going away," said Mike Africa Jr.

Read the full statement from Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber:

I was deeply troubled, as many others have been, by the questions that came to light this past week surrounding the treatment of the remains of a victim of the 1985 bombing of the MOVE house in Philadelphia. I am especially concerned that the remains were used for instruction on our campus, including in a publicly available online course created at Princeton for the Coursera platform and taught by a visiting lecturer from the University of Pennsylvania.

Princeton University extends its apologies to the Africa family for the use of the remains in courses offered by Princeton. I believe we have a responsibility to our campus and the larger community to understand fully and clearly the facts surrounding this matter. I have accordingly authorized a fact-finding effort, to be conducted by outside counsel, to help us gain a complete understanding of the scope and nature of Princeton's role in the handling of the remains and related issues. The University will share its findings and use them to help shape the steps we can take moving forward for our community.

Princeton University's commitment to teaching and scholarship in the service of humanity depends on treating everyone we encounter with dignity and respect. This includes our campus community, the community at large, and those we encounter through our scholarship. It is important to find and share the facts when we fall short, and to take corrective action that allows us to realize our commitment and fulfill our responsibilities.
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