First probable case of monkeypox in Delaware reported

The disease begins with a fever, headache, fatigue, chills and muscle aches.

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Wednesday, July 13, 2022
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Officials said the man is self-isolating and DPH is working with him to identify any possible close contacts.

NEW CASTLE, Delaware (WPVI) -- Delaware is reporting its first probable case of monkeypox.

A 41-year-old man from New Castle County is believed to have been exposed to the virus earlier this month.

"This positive case is considered probable pending confirmatory testing by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Delaware man did not report any travel or exposure to someone known to have MPX but is believed to have been exposed to the virus after close intimate contact with an individual in early July," the Delaware Division of Public Health said in a press release Tuesday.

Officials said the man is self-isolating and DPH is working with him to identify any possible close contacts.

DPH is working with the CDC to confirm the course of treatment for the man, the department said.

"As we work to confirm our first case in the state, we encourage Delawareans to be aware of being in close intimate contact with individuals who have rashes or flu-like symptoms. We will continue to monitor this situation closely," said DPH Interim Director Dr. Rick Hong.

In Pennsylvania, 27 people have tested positive for the virus. Eighteen of those cases are here in the southeast region.

New Jersey has reported at least eight cases.

Monkeypox cases around the world have increased 77% in seven days, the World Health Organization said last Thursday.

Three deaths have been reported in Africa, where monkeypox is considered an endemic. There have been no deaths from the virus in the U.S and in other parts of the world.

People who identify as gay, bisexual or men who sleep with men make up most of the cases, according to the WHO's report.

Health experts have warned that despite those groups making up the majority of cases, anyone can test positive for the virus.

The incubation period from the time a person is exposed to when symptoms first appear can be anywhere from five to 21 days, according to the WHO.

The disease begins with a fever, headache, fatigue, chills and muscle aches. Monkeypox also causes swollen lymph nodes.

The Department of Health and Human Services said it's sending nearly 300,000 doses of the JYNNEOS vaccine for prevention of the disease for people who have been exposed.

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ABC News contributed to this report.