ACCT says it's dealing with too many exotic animals: What you should know

Many can not survive in our local ecosystem. They could become a new predator and plague an unsuspecting neighborhood.

Annie McCormick Image
Thursday, September 1, 2022
ACCT says it's dealing with too many exotic animals
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One of the problems with ACCT accepting these exotic animals is they don't have a place to store them, and they really can only house exotic animals for one to two days.

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- The Animal Care and Control Team (ACCT) is already trying to clear the shelters of cats and dogs, but now the organization says it's also dealing with a number of exotic animals.

"It seems to be an increase in the past two months, also just calls where people are finding them in random places. One of the calls was a snake found in someone's recliner and they did not have a pet snake," said Sarah Barnett of the ACCT.

One of the problems with ACCT accepting these exotic animals is they don't have a place to store them, and they really can only house exotic animals for one to two days.

Most of these exotic animals are legal. But if people don't have the time and space requirements, it's harmful and cruel to the animal, and they risk getting loose.

Barnett also said someone was trying to surrender a Siberian tiger cub recently.

"You can't have the right habitat for a Siberian tiger. It's cruel and it's a huge safety risk. We offered to take it and connect it with a sanctuary. They seemed excited, then called their friend who already sold the cub," said Barnett.

And here's a warning for those thinking about releasing snakes, reptiles and birds into the wild.

"They're not wild at this point. They've been domesticated enough," said Barnett.

Many cannot survive in our local ecosystem. They could become a new predator and plague an unsuspecting neighborhood.

"A Burmese python can eat someone's chihuahua if it's loose," said Barnett.