Former Eagle battles incumbent in NJ district

Pictured: John Adler and Jon Runyan

September 17, 2010 3:26:35 PM PDT
It's never too early for negative ads, if one congressional race in South Jersey is any indication.

Democratic congressman John Adler and Republican Jon Runyan have been trading political barbs for weeks.

"John Adler, his whole career, has been nothing but a tax and spend politician," said Runyan.

"He's trying to paint me into a corner in ways that, if you've seen my voting record, are just false. I understand desperate candidates do stuff like that," said Adler.

It's clear to everyone, especially TV viewers, that the battle for New Jersey's Third Congressional District has gone negative.

In those ads, Adler accuses Runyan of taking farm credit on his Mt. Laurel estate in order to pay lower taxes. Runyan's ad is designed to remind voters that Adler has been in politics a long time.

Runyan, a former Eagles offensive lineman, is making his first appearance in politics. He says Adler has spread lies designed to scare seniors by saying Runyan wants to dismantle Social Security and Medicare.

"These are programs we need and programs we have to preserve for future generations," Runyan said.

Runyan has also criticized Adler's campaign for photographing his mansion and frightening his 8-year-old daughter. Adler denies the child was photographed.

"That's a silly smear that I'm shocked he would do. I saw him a few days ago and he could have asked me that and I could have told that it's false, it's utterly false," Adler said.

The Third District includes parts of Ocean and Burlington counties and Cherry Hill in Camden County. Both candidates have their supporters.

"I believe that Runyan's style is what this district needs," said Anthony Ross of Cinnaminson.

"I think John Adler will do a good job. Mr. Runyan? Now that's a different story. I think he needs to stay with the sports," said Bernadette Klauser of Palmyra.

Jon Runyan is a political novice, while John Adler is an experience politician - which may not necessarily be a good thing in a year of anti-incumbent sentiment.


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