Philadelphia Police: #NoSavesies, have a heart

Watch report from Action News
February 14, 2014 8:54:18 PM PST
It is a creative new social media initiative by the Philadelphia Police to help curb parking problems in residential communities during snow storms.

It's called "No Savies", and the question is will it work?

It is an age old tradition in some snowbound Philadelphia neighborhoods. You dig out your car, then leave a lawn chair to save the spot.

But police are reminding everyone that there are "no savesies", and a lot of residents are finding that difficult to accept.

"This is South Philly," said Joe Chalder. "You have to play the game. You put your chairs out, you put your cones out, to save your spot."

According to the city, residents are not supposed to save parking spaces, it has become an old argument that sometimes causes arguments, but people still do it.

"If I dig it out, I deserve the spot," said Chalder.

Philadelphia police have taken to social media to tackle the problem. Using the Twitter #Nosavesies, they are urging people to have a heart on Valentine's Day, dig out your vehicle and leave the spot clear.

Someone later posted a tweet saying: "Philly Police officer in the 18th District practicing NoSavesies etiquette. My kinda guy."

Taisa Hewka agrees.

"Everybody has the right to park there so it's not very fair especially when it's a space that covers anybody on the block," said Hewka.

Chad Ostrowski tweeted: "Have a heart, don't take other people's hard-won clean parking spots."

Kia Richards agrees.

"It's just unbelievable that people watch you dig out your car and know that you did it, and then take your parking spot and you have nowhere to park your car when you get home," she said.

"Whatever they place, whether it's a chair or any other personal item, it can be confiscated," said Lt. John Stanford. "If it is sitting in the street area, it is considered abandoned property, so that is something that will and can be confiscated by the Police department."

Police say they know that people work hard to dig out parking spaces, but it is public property, and once you drive off, people are allowed to park there.

They say they are very aware that residents are possessive of their parking space, but saving spaces sometimes leads to arguments and even violence, and that is what they are trying to avoid.


Load Comments